Energy Storage: Helping homes to be less reliant on grid

A new solar energy storage technology project has been given a green light in The Meadows area of Nottingham.

This European-funded project will be used by the home owners to store their solar energy for later use.

Energy storage technology means less reliance on the grid, creating more sustainable communities. The project will also research the issues and parameters of community energy schemes that sell and share self-generated energy from homes in the project. It will use ‘communal batteries’ located in the areas of school as part of this.

The installation will start early in 2017. There are 37 homes from across the neighbourhood that will take part in the project, and 22 of these will receive technology that will allow them to use significantly more of their clean green energy generated from their own solar photovoltaic (PV) panels.

“This project is making the most of domestic solar energy generation; this means more energy will stay within the community, reducing the need to draw on energy from the grid, thus reducing household electricity bills,” architect and member of MOZES, Julian Marsh said.

“We will monitor household energy patterns for 18 months to see what benefit there is to storing the excess energy and to see how people react to their ‘free’ electricity in the evenings and we will also be researching the storing of thermal energy (heat) produced by solar PV panels together with dual tariff systems to reduce the total energy costs,” Principal Research Fellow at The University of Nottingham, Lee Empringham said.

“We will monitor household energy patterns for 18 months to see what benefit there is to storing the excess energy and to see how people react to their ‘free’ electricity in the evenings and we will also be researching the storing of thermal energy (heat) produced by solar PV panels together with dual tariff systems to reduce the total energy costs,” Principal Research Fellow at The University of Nottingham, Lee Empringham said.

Recently, two key partners joined the team; Queen’s award-winning charity Nottingham Energy Partnership and renewable energy experts T4 Sustainability following a successful tender to deliver the project on the ground.

T4 Sustainability will start installing in January 2017. The system will be free to the householder.

“The use of batteries to store energy helps to reduce the load on the grid at times of peak demand, which in the long run reduces costs and bills,” commented by John Beardmore from T4.

The SENSIBLE consortium brings together partners from six European countries: Germany, Finland, France, Portugal, Spain and the UK. There are three demonstrator sites; Évora – Portugal, Nuremberg – Germany and Nottingham – UK.